Optimize yourself! [Part 2]

Things you can do better in Unity!

This is the second part of our tips list, that can help you increase your productivity with Unity.

The first part can be found here. So definitely check it out if you haven’t already!

1. Unity project setup wizard

When you’re creating a new project it often takes at least half an hour to setup everything. There are at least 2 ways for you to save time here:

  1. Simple: create a project template with basic setup, folder structure and version control ignore file. This will be the most efficient one to make and you can put stuff in it already. But it is not the most customizable one, so probably you will need to spend this additional time on finishing your configuration.
  1. Advanced: create a module that will be responsible for setting up your whole project in a way you want it. With as many game/folder structure/architecture variants as you’d like to have. And in a perfect world, it would be great to have such module but it takes time to make it.

No matter which option you choose, it is always helpful to have a solid foundation for you project 😉

2. Finally you drag the list of objects into the component

Sometimes you may come across a case where you have to fill the list of objects with objects from a scene or a project. When you’ll first try to select all of the objects you’d like to assign, you’ll realise that Inspector is no longer showing you object with your list to fill. There is a very simple solution to that, and not many people know about it.

In a top right corner of Inspector there’s a lock button, that locks Inspector focus on current view.

Now you can select as many objects as you like and you can easily drag and drop them all into the list in Inspector.

Done!

3. Use build-in json tools

Normally, when you are working with JSONs, you have to have JSON parser. After parsing a string into JSON object, you have to assign all the values from JSON to the desired object, which is super boring to write each time…

However, since the Unity 5.3 they gave us built-in JsonUtility which will do most of it for you!

Warning: JsonUtility currently works only with ‘structured’ JSON and does not support types, like dictionaries. If this is a problem for you, then you probably need to find a fully-featured JSON library.

For more information about JsonUtility you can go to: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/JSONSerialization.html

4. One script that handles all of the platforms?

If you are new to programming, you probably don’t know much about platform dependent compilation. If you are into programming, then you have probably seen a code that uses platform dependent compilation a few times, but you might not understand how it works. It’s simple! It gives you the power to write the code that will be executed only on a specific platform. So you might ask why it’s good to use it? Because you can use libraries designed only for one platform.

For example: you are making the greatest game of all time for Android and iOS. And you want to implement that last feature, namely leaderboards. You’ve created a button to show these native leaderboards and assign method OpenMainLeaderboard() to it. And now it’s time to implement this method, but how will you run Google Play Services on Android and Game Center on iOS?! That’s simple! Use platform dependent compilation!

Example:

With that you don’t have to worry about the missing references from libraries that are not designed to run on other platforms.

If you’d like to find more platform directives go to: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/PlatformDependentCompilation.html

5. Don’t waste your time for reimporting project over and over again

Aren’t you tired of waiting for your project to be reimported each time you change build platform? For me it’s not only boring, but also wasting a lot of time! But there is a mighty solution for that, which no one ever told you about!

In Unity there is something called Cache Server. It can be configured to work on your local machine or on a dedicated server. This cache server will save your reimported assets and when you change your build platform, it will give you back your reimported assets, so you don’t have to reimport them again! This is great! And the only thing you have to do is to go to Unity > Preferences > Cache Server and change Cache Server Mode to Local or Remote.

You can read more about Cache Server on our blog:

http://blog.theknightsofunity.com/using-unity-cache-server/

http://blog.theknightsofunity.com/unity-cache-server-localhost-make-sense/

Summary

That was top 10 things that you can do better in Unity (with those in the  previous part)!

I hope that this list will help you save a little more time that you will still waste by watching another cat video on the internet 🙂

If you have your own trick to speed up your work, then don’t hesitate to share it in a comment section below.

And don’t forget! Optimize yourself!
You can also subscribe to our newsletter, so you won’t miss our posts in the future!

Optimize yourself! [Part 1]

Things you can do better in Unity!

How many times you’ve been bored or annoyed because of some stuff you had to do over and over again? Probably countless… But fear no more!

Bill Gates once said “I choose a lazy person to do a hard job. Because a lazy person will find an easy way to do it.”.

And you might ask why even I’m bringing this quote here? It’s because I am going to make you lazy in a good way… 😉

Let’s get it started

The main reason we came up with idea for that list is the fact that we (as  humans) are lazy by design and we don’t like to repeat ourselves in our daily tasks. As a  result, we came up with tools and tricks that we use to make our life easier and we hope to make it easier also for you!

So here are top 10 things you can do better in Unity:

1. Change your play mode editor color!

How many times you’ve been tweaking your game to be in this one perfect spot? And all of a sudden you realized that you just clicked on pause button and lost all of those changes? Of course this is how Unity works, but how many times you forgot about it? Probably not only once. 😉

So the simplest solution to remind you that you’re in the play mode is to change editor’s play mode color! To do so, just go to Unity > Preferences > Colors and change your Playmode tint color to something more vivid.

Results?

2. Let the code write itself

There are many tools that can extend your IDE and give you just a little bit of support for your programming skills. One of such extensions is JetBrains ReSharper which is so useful that you probably won’t want to program anything without it.

This tool analyzes the code for you. This tool writes the code for you. This tool finds bugs for you. THIS TOOL EVEN FIX THOSE BUGS FOR YOU! Maybe not all of them, but it fixes the typical ones without any problems 😉 If you are programmer then you should definitely check it out.

Here are some examples:

  • Converting code to Linq:

  • Converting code from Linq:

  • Adding missing usings:

  • Generating methods:

Home page of ReSharper: https://www.jetbrains.com/resharper/

3. Optimize your build pipeline

When you’re developing your next very best app or game you are probably making a lot of builds per day. Each build can take up a few minutes or even an hour to make. This is bad especially because it’s impeding your work till the build is finished.

So let’s count the time you waste because of that process. Let’s say that your project is medium sized and need ~20 minutes to build on Android and ~1 hour to build on iOS. And you’re making 1 build per day at minimum. Now let’s sum up the time it takes to make those builds in one month (20 work days): Android builds – at least 6h 40m. iOS builds – at least 40h. This is more time than it took first spacecraft (Luna 1) to make flyby of the Moon in 1959! Which took only 36h! But how to save so much of your time? Use external tool to make those builds for you!

For a long time, the most popular one was Jenkins, which offers you a lot of flexibility. Also, it’s giving you basically unlimited possibility to configure your build pipeline to suit your needs, for example:

  1. Watch repository for new commits.
  2. Analyze code.
  3. Make a build.
  4. When finished, send build file to a FTP server.
  5. Send mail with a build report and a link to build file.

Of course there are a lot more options, and if you ever need more, then you can always add some. Oh, and I almost forgot! It’s available for free! So you just need to go to their website, download it and install it on your build machine 😉

More about Jenkins: https://jenkins.io

The other tool is provided by Unity itself and it’s called Unity Cloud Builds. It of course assures better integration with editor, where you can basically configure everything you need to start using it. Like Jenkins, it is also available for free, but with Unity subscription your builds will be higher in priority list and will be processed faster. Additionally, after each build Unity generates the link to your build to download or to share with your friends 😉

More about Unity Cloud Builds: https://unity3d.com/services/cloud-build

So what are differences between these two? Jenkins is open-sourced and has a huge library of plugins to install. You can for example integrate 3rd party APIs like Slack with it. Jenkins also allows you to configure it any way you like it and give you a possibility of setting up your own build pipeline. On the other hand, Unity Cloud is only focused around Unity and you can’t add anything to it. Of course you can configure Slack to get notifications from Cloud or use Webhooks that Unity provides, but that’s it. But the advantage is that it is straightforward, easy to configure and use.

Which one should you use? If you need something simple, then go with Unity Cloud Builds. If you need something more advanced, with a lot of configuration options, then go with Jenkins.

4. Store your data in convenient way

Many people put the data into objects on a scene or hardcode it somewhere else. With that approach it’s often hard to find where you have to make a change in order to achieve a desired result later in development…

But we’re here to present you two better ways to store data:

  1. Text Asset, which can be JSON, Excel file or any other text format. The problematic aspect of it is that in such file you can put only text, and you need to have a parser to read this file and get your data.
  2. The other and more convenient way is to create ScriptableObject. You can put there anything you like. Text, numbers, textures, material, models, etc. And most important thing is that you can use it like any other asset in your project and reading data from it is as easy as getting a variable.

Here is an example of ScriptableObject code:

And with that code you can easily create as many WeaponData objects as you want 😉

5. Auto references

Creating UI is not the most pleasant thing to do, mostly because you have many scripts, that need even more references, which you have to assign by hand. Wouldn’t it be great to have all of these references filled all by themselves?

Of course! Here is a sample implementation for that:

Here is class example of use of that implementation:

Here is how it looks in Unity:

These references were added automatically! 😉

Summary

So, here’re 5 tips that hopefully can help you exclude a chore part from the Unity development process and boost your productivity. I’ll be adding more tips like that in the next part, so stay tuned!

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